ASL Information on Breast Cancer

Realplayer is required to view these clips, download the Realplayer

Links to Transcripts and Video Clips:

Title Sequence

  1. Introduction
  2. What exactly is Breast Cancer?
  3. How do I know if I'm at risk of Breast Cancer
  4. Why is early detection so important?
  5. How can we find breast cancer early?
  6. How do you do a good breast self exam?
  7. What happens if I find a lump?
  8. You said we have more treatment options when Breast Cancer is detected early. Will you please explain?
  9. Another important option to consider is clinical trails

I. Introduction

ASL Video and Voice Overlay

Transcript:

Hello, my name is Darline Clark Gunsauls. Breast Cancer is the most commonly occurring cancer in women. While it is certainly a life threatening cancer, nearly all women could survive if they found it early. The University of California, San Diego Cancer Center and Deaf Community Services of San Diego together with the UCSD Department of Communication and Gallaudet University have created this Breast Cancer education program for Deaf and severely hard of hearing women. It is important for both communities to have a better understanding of breast cancer, how it can be detected in the earliest possible stages, and why early detection can make a life and death difference. As a deaf woman, I had a very limited understanding of breast cancer before I began to work with this program. As my friend Kathy Buckley will tell you, women who are severely hard of hearing also need to be offered a better understanding of this disease and what to do about it. Kathy will speak to Hard of Hearing women while I sign for the Deaf women.

Breast Cancer is one of the most frightening diseases women face. I know. Thanks to early detection, my chances of survival are excellent. I want other severely hard of hearing and deaf women to have the same excellent chance of survival that I have. Darline Clark Gunsaul has invited us to join her at a breast cancer training session specifically created for deaf and severely hard of hearing women. As a cervical cancer survivor, I know that the more information I have, the earlier I can find breast cancer and the better my chances of survival. Better yet, the earlier that a woman finds a breast cancer, the more treatment choices she will have. Darline's breast cancer education program is just about to begin. Let's join her

II. What exactly is breast cancer?

ASL Video and Voice Overlay

Transcript:

Today, I am here to explain about Breast Cancer and how early detection can save your life. Now let's begin.

If the doctor tells you that you have breast cancer, it does not mean that you will surely die. With early detection most women will survive breast cancer.

The body makes new cells to replace the old cells. Look at this smiley face representing a normal cell. When it reproduces, it usually produces other cells just like itself. Once in a while it produces a cell that is slightly different, like this smiley faced cell with one sad eye. It may take many more small changes like this before one change occurs which forever changes how that new cell will behave. Suddenly, this cell becomes aggressive in the speed with which it makes new cells just like itself. This cell is now behaving like a cancer cell and the growing accumulation of cancer cells is called a tumor or a lump.

III. How do I know if I am at risk for breast cancer?

ASL Video and Voice Overlay

Transcript:

The three greatest risk factors are being a woman, growing older, and having a mother, sister, or daughter with breast cancer. A small number of men also get breast cancer each year.

IV. Why is early detection so important?

ASL Video and Voice Overlay

Transcript:

With early detection, breast cancer can be found when it is still as small as a bead on a dress. Late stage means identifying the cancer after some cells have broken off from the original tumor cluster and moved through the blood and lymph system to other parts of the body. It could be the liver, bone marrow, brain, kidney or any other organs. (Showing the beads/lumps:) These beads are like tumor sizes. The smaller the bead the less chance that cells have broken away from the tumor and moved to other parts of the body.

How big a difference does early detection make?

Now, imagine 100 women who have breast cancer from each group: (pause) early detection and late detection. Let’s compare how many women will survive thru the years.

For early detection, after 5 years, 98 women will still be alive. For late detection, after 5 years only, 10 women will still be alive.

For early detection, after 10 years, 95 women will still be alive. For late detection, after 10 years, 2 women will still be alive.

For early detection, after 20 years, 92 women will still be alive. For late detection, after 20 years, it is unlikely that any women will still be alive.

Clearly early detection made a life and death difference for those number of women.

V. How can we find breast cancer early?

ASL Video and Voice Overlay

Transcript:

Yes.There are currently 3 ways to find breast cancer early: Mammography, Clinical Breast Exams, and Self-Breast Exams. Let me tell you what you need to know about each of these 3 methods of early detection.

The first method is mammography. Mammography is an x-ray of the breast. On a first mammogram, a breast cancer can be found that is smaller than the size of a pea. (Showing the beads).When patients have had prior mammograms, her doctor can compare the earlier ones with the current mammogram. Doing this allows them to find ever smaller differences. Women should have a mammogram every 1-2 years beginning at age 40 and every year beginning at age 50. A mammogram can also be done at any age when the doctor or woman feels an abnormality in the breast tissue.

Most breast cancer occurs in the upper outer portion of the breast.

Since the Breast Tissue extends under the arm it is very important for the mammography technician to gently but firmly pull all of that breast tissue onto the mammography plate so it will be in the picture. This tugging, pulling and compression will last about 15 seconds. Also do not use deodorant or powder before your mammogram. This can cause false images on the x-ray.

Mammography can find 85% of breast cancers. Because 15% of breast cancers are missed by mammography, it is important for women to also use the other two methods of detecting breast cancer early.

In a Clinical Breast Exam, your doctor or nurse practitioner will do the breast exam for you. Beginning at age 20, this should be done every 3 years. Beginning at age 40, this should be done every year for the rest of your life.

Beginning at age 20, women should do a breast self exam every month as a supplement to mammography and a clinical breast exam every three years. You do this check by yourself at home. Please make sure you teach your loved ones to learn how to do it, too.

VI. How do you do a good breast self exam?

ASL Video and Voice Overlay

Transcript:

You can call your local American Cancer Society, or the National Cancer Institute's 1-800-4CANCER for a good brochure.

There are several key points to doing a good breast self exam. The first step is to look at your breasts in the mirror. Are they both the same size and shape they have always been? Raise your arms and look at your breasts in the mirror. Then put your hands on your hips. Do both breasts still look the same? Is there any dimpling in any part of your breasts? The next step is to lie down on your bed and place a towel or small pillow under the shoulder of the breast you will examine first.

I just showed you how to lie down with a pillow or towel underneath you. Now I will explain how to slide your fingers along the breast. Do not lift them and move them or you might miss a change. Now repeat the process. Use a vertical strip pattern so you cover the whole breast, including the breast tissue that continues into the armpit. It’s best to do a breast self exam after your menstrual period because the breasts are less tender at that time. If you are no longer menstruating, you can exam your breasts any time of the month. Please teach your relatives and friends how to do a breast self exam. You could help them save their lives.

VII. What happens if I find a lump?

ASL Video and Voice Overlay

Transcript:

First, 80 % of lumps are not cancer. But, further diagnostic tests will be needed. Additional mammograms may be suggested. Ultrasound is another diagnostic option. It is a completely painless procedure. Sometimes the doctor will recommend a follow up in a few months if these tests are not conclusive. A biopsy may also be recommended.

If a biopsy is needed, this will be done as an outpatient. There are two methods of collecting samples of the abnormal looking cells. In both cases the location of the abnormal cells is identified by mammography if it cannot be felt by the surgeon. The biopsy area will be anesthetized, just like you get when you go to dentist and have the local anesthetic for your cavitiy filling. The same process occurs. The doctor will use a local anesthetic so the procedure is as painless as possible. One method of removing a small sample of cells is called fine needle aspiration, also called FNA. In this case, a needle is used to withdraw some of the abnormal tissues out of the cluster of cells so they can be examined under a microscope. In the second method, a small incision is made and a small amount of cells are removed so they too can be examined under the microscope. If abnormal cells are found, treatment will be needed If the lump is large, the doctor may also need to take a sample of cells from one or more lymph nodes under the arm.

Why do they need to do that if breast cancer is what I am worried about?

If you have breast cancer, you and your doctor must decide what treatment will give you the best chance of survival. Knowing whether there is a high or low risk that the cancer has spread beyond the breast is an important factor in that decision. The first place cancer cells might get trapped is in the lymph nodes under the armpits, so the doctor will check there.

VIII. Treatment

ASL Video and Voice Overlay

Transcript:

You said we have more treatment options when breast cancer is detected early. Will you please explain?

There are several treatment options. If the cancer tumor is very small a lumpectomy may be an option. In a lumpectomy, only the abnormal cells and a very small amount of normal cells surrounding the tumor are removed.. For larger tumors, the doctor can recommend a segmental mastectomy (graphic) in which a larger wedge of the breast tissue is removed. For larger cancers, the surgeon may feel that a mastectomy is needed. In this case the entire breast is removed. Sometimes also all of the lymph nodes from the armpit are removed as well to reduce the risk that cancer cells in the lymph nodes will grow and spread to other parts of the body. (Graphic) In the event that a mastectomy will be needed, women should also have a pre-surgical consultation with a plastic surgeon so that they have the option of breast reconstruction later.

In addition to surgery, there are other treatment options that may be recommended if the spread of the breast cancer is a possibility. These include radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and hormone therapy. Radiation is used to kill any abnormal cells in the breast that are not yet visible on a mammogram. Chemotherapy is used to kill any cancer cells that may have spread to other parts of the body. Hormone therapy can help. Sometimes a woman's ovaries are also removed since they produce the natural hormones that help the cancer grow.

IX. Clinical Trials

ASL Video and Voice Overlay

Transcript:

You said we have more treatment options when breast cancer is detected early. Will you please explain?

There are several treatment options. If the cancer tumor is very small a lumpectomy may be an option. In a lumpectomy, only the abnormal cells and a very small amount of normal cells surrounding the tumor are removed.. For larger tumors, the doctor can recommend a segmental mastectomy (graphic) in which a larger wedge of the breast tissue is removed. For larger cancers, the surgeon may feel that a mastectomy is needed. In this case the entire breast is removed. Sometimes also all of the lymph nodes from the armpit are removed as well to reduce the risk that cancer cells in the lymph nodes will grow and spread to other parts of the body. (Graphic) In the event that a mastectomy will be needed, women should also have a pre-surgical consultation with a plastic surgeon so that they have the option of breast reconstruction later.

In addition to surgery, there are other treatment options that may be recommended if the spread of the breast cancer is a possibility. These include radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and hormone therapy. Radiation is used to kill any abnormal cells in the breast that are not yet visible on a mammogram. Chemotherapy is used to kill any cancer cells that may have spread to other parts of the body. Hormone therapy can help. Sometimes a woman's ovaries are also removed since they produce the natural hormones that help the cancer grow.

Closing | Credits